Tag Archives: Schools

McKinley School

McKinley School
McKinley School, 1950

The first McKinley School was built in 1920 and located on Cottage and South Gay Street, on the same lot that the former Washington School, nee Credence was located.

Yet, it was the Washington School that was built in 1900 that time had taken a toll on the structure. In 1947, the Susanville School District were concerned that it would not pass a number of safety codes. The following year the building was condemned and the district was concerned McKinley, too, would suffer the same fate. The District now had the daunting task to find funds to replace the two schools. The State of California determined that the District was determined “distressed” and was eligible for $341,065 in funds. It was decided to create two neighborhood schools, and McKinley was located to Fourth Street. The new school building opened its doors in May 1950.

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Lincoln School

Lincoln School
Lincoln School, 1924

In 1920, voters of the Susanville School District passed a bond measure to build a second school. The trustees indicated, however, that with the accelerated growth another school would be needed. What they had not bargained for was just how quickly the need would arise. On January 14, 1922 the District held another bond election for a new school. The voters approved the $50,000 measure by a vote of 140 to 5. In March, the District purchased a lot on the south side of Main Street at the intersection of Hall Street. In June local contractors Woodward & Grebe were awarded a $35,000 contract to build it. The school was completed and placed in use during the first week of February 1923. The Lincoln School closed at the end of the 1966-67 school year.

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Lassen High School

Lassen High 08
Lassen High School, 1908 courtesy of Phil Hall

Construction of the high school began in the fall of 1905 and was ready the following year. The school was constructed by Granite Rock Company for $25,670.

The photograph depicted above was taken in 1908, when the school grounds was fenced, not to keep the students in, but to keep roaming livestock off the school property.

Don’t forget you can still get the complete DVD collection of the Lassen High Yearbooks from 1904 to 2013. However, I only have about fifteen left.

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Susanville School Names

Schools
McKinley School (left) and Washington School (right) as seen from Richmond Road, 1935.

When the Susanville School District was established in 1864, the town had only one school, located on Cottage Street. This remained the status quo for nearly sixty years.

With the arrival and the lumber mills, the town experienced a huge population surge.  In 1920, a second school was needed and it was also constructed on the Cottage Street property. The growing pains of Susanville continued and a third school was built, this time in the Milwood District in 1922. Another three years went by, and yet another school was constructed, this time on Richmond Road.

With four schools in operation the district, decided to give them names, which they honored past United States Presidents. The first school was named Washington; the second McKinley, the third, Lincoln and the fourth school Roosevelt.

In 1967, when it was decided to build a middle school to replace Roosevelt, a more generic name was given–Diamond View.

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Lassen College

Lassen College
Lassen College on the Lassen Union High School campus.

Today marks the 90th anniversary of Lassen Junior College Initially, it was a separate department of Lassen Union High School and classes were held at the high school. In 1941, a separate facility was created. In 1946, with increased enrollment a new college building was built to the west of the high school. In 1965, the college separated from the high school to be known as Lassen Community College. In 1970, groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the initial construction of the current campus on Highway 139.

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Ash Valley School

Ash Valley School 1916
Ash Valley School 1916

In July 1875, eighteen Ash Valley residents petitioned for the formation of a school district. The Board of Supervisors tabled it. The petition failed to enumerate how many children resided in the valley. Of note, the majority of the petitioners were bachelors. A year later, a new petition was submitted that informed the Board there were fifteen children in the valley—the petition was approved.

Sometime in the late 1870s, the residents worked together to construct the schoolhouse. Records are not clear, but between 1917 and 1919 the school was closed. In July 1920, the residents requested the school be re-established and the request was granted. In 1923, the school closed again, as Julia A. Norwood, County Superintendent of Schools stated there was not a sufficient number of students. Norwood, on an optimistic note, ordered that the school’s fixtures and equipment remain in tact. The records, again, do not indicate when the school re-opened. At the County Board of Supervisor’s meeting of August 20, 1929 the minutes state: “Mrs. Mary Bath, Mr. & Mrs. J.T. Bath of Ash Valley appeared before the Board in the interest on emergency school at Ash Valley. It appearing that the proper showing had been made for this school, Mr. Bath is advised that a teacher would be designated.” This problem occurred again in 1934, when the school trustees were not able to secure a teacher and it was designated as an “emergency class.” The Board hired Jessie B. Madison for its teacher. The school closed for a final time in 1941. The last students to graduate were John Bath and Martha Bath in 1938. In September 1946, the Board of Supervisors declared the school as surplus property and ordered its sale, yet no buyers came forward.

Ash Valley School
Ash Valley School, as viewed from the cemetery, 2002.

It should be noted the school is located on a 40 acre parcel that also contains the Ash Valley Cemetery.

Willow Creek School

Willow Creek School 1886
Willow Creek School 1886

In the spring of 1871, the residents of Willow Creek Valley constructed and operated a private school at the west end of the valley near the Murrer Ranch. Miss Fanny Lovell was employed to teach the first classes. In June 1871, residents petitioned the Lassen County Board of Supervisors for the formation of a school district and that was granted. It was not until 1877, when John Dobler donated the land that the school was built on, with a stipulation that the property would revert back to him or his heirs when it was no longer used for a school. Continue reading Willow Creek School

Lake School

Lake School
Lake School, 1886

One of the original six school districts established in 1864. In 1877, the District constructed a two-story schoolhouse with the assistance of the Independent Order of Good Templars. The second story was used as a hall for that organization. In 1934 the second story was removed as part of a WPA project. Francis Wilbur, a local carpenter was hired to do the work at a cost of $1,740.

In 1953, a ballot referendum was held to consolidate the Janesville, Lake, and Missouri Bend schools. The Lake District voters opposed it. In 1971, the school closed and annexed to Janesville. In 1975, the Janesville District declared the Lake School as surplus property and it was deeded to George and Jane Bailey. The schoolhouse has since been converted into a private residence.

Roosevelt Pool

Roosevelt Pool
Remnants of Roosevelt Pool, February 21, 2015

It is only fitting to begin the daily post with some current and past history combined. In mid-February saw the demolition of one of Susanville’s notable landmarks, the Roosevelt Pool. It is part of the effort to build a new swimming pool adjacent to it. The pool it should be noted had set idle for nearly a decade when it was condemned in December 2004.

How the pool came to be is an interesting one. In 1912, the Lassen Weekly Mail announced that Lassen County had purchased some property near the proposed railroad depot site for a new hospital and cemetery. However, that was not the case. Yet, the county realized it had to seek a new location for its hospital and cemetery.

Continue reading Roosevelt Pool