Red River: End of an Era

The installation of the Hammerhead Crane at Westwood, was one of many improvements to entice buyers.
The installation of the Hammerhead Crane at Westwood, was one of many improvements to entice buyers.

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It is only appropriate to feature this volume, number four in the Red River series, as last week featured volume number three.  It was originally thought that Red River’s Westwood mill would operate into perpetuity.  However, in less than thirty years in operation proved that theory wrong. There was the family drama, not all wanted to dispose of Westwood, but those that did out numbered those wanting to exit. On the bright side, with World War II, the demand for lumber soared, and so for once did Red River’s profits.  Thus, it seemed conditions were ideal to unload it, but Westwood was an albatross. No one wanted a mammoth mill, let alone a company town. Red River’s bargaining chip, it still owned vast swaths of timber and that is what the buyers wanted.
In addition to the saga of Red River’s departure from Westwood, this volume also wraps up a lot of loose ends. Included are such issues of what became of many of its landmarks, and that of the roadhouses that was once a dominant feature between Westwood and Susanville.  In addition, are Westwood institutions such as the Westwood Auto Club, the Westwood National Bank among other topics. To order your copy, is just a click away, here.

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